• Wed. May 18th, 2022

There are four ways to participate in Ann Arbor’s sustainable energy future

ByKarol Donimirski

May 2, 2022

Officials in Ann Arbor are hoping that renewable energy will provide 100 percent of the city’s electricity by 2030, and one part of the equation is the creation of a municipal-owned sustainable energy utility to assist fund solar installations for businesses and homes throughout the city.

The city is currently seeking public input on the concept of forming a municipal power utility, also known as the SEU, to enhance DTE Energy’s service to the community.

There are four ways for people of the community to participate, including an online poll that will be open until June 30 and will assess the interests of the public in the SEU.

“The envisaged Ann Arbor SEU would become a community-owned utility which would deliver 100 percent clean, reliable, locally built, and cheap power; developed by the community, for the community,” said Missy Stults, the city’s sustainability director, in a statement.

At two future webinars, city employees will describe the SEU idea, gather comments, and answer questions. This is going to be on 29th April and on 4th May.

Installing solar and energy storage solutions in homes and businesses improves energy reliability.

Energy waste reduction (efficiency) projects that save money while increasing comfort, safety, and health for residents.

Financing options like on-bill financing can assist reduce upfront expenses and provide you with more options when it comes to paying for renovations.

Assistance with switching from gas to electric appliances, as well as associated staff training.

Microgrids are shared solar & battery storage solutions between neighboring households.

Residents can profit from solar panels put in common areas of the city through community solar projects.

Initiatives aimed at ensuring that everyone in the community has access to clean energy.

In January, City Council directed staff to begin planning to investigate the viability of forming a conventional municipal electric utility to substitute DTE as the city’s energy supplier and, as an option to a DTE power grid takeover, to investigate the SEU model to complement DTE service. Last week, Milton Dohoney, who is the City Administrator, proposed spending $250,000 for feasibility studies as well as rate analysis in the coming fiscal year, and the budget is currently awaiting council approval in May.

The city has a project site featuring a 10-minute film that gives a high-level description of the prospective SEU and the services it would provide, such as:

 

  • Installing solar and energy storage solutions in homes and businesses improves energy reliability.
  • Energy waste reduction (efficiency) projects that save money while increasing comfort, safety, and health for residents.
  • Financing options like financing can assist reduce upfront expenses and provide you with more options when it comes to paying for renovations.
  • Assistance with switching from gas to electric appliances, as well as associated staff training.
  • Microgrids are shared solar and battery storage solutions between neighboring households.
  • Residents can profit from solar panels put in common areas of the city through community solar projects.
  • Initiatives aimed at ensuring that everybody in the community has access to clean energy.

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